Applications for Yahoo!’s third annual Key Scientific Challenges Program are due March 11. Our goal is to support students working in areas we feel represent the future of the Internet. If you’re a Ph.D. student working in one of the areas below, please apply!

We are thrilled to announce Yahoo!’s third annual Key Scientific Challenges Program. This is your chance to get an inside look at — and help tackle — the big challenges that Yahoo! and the entire Internet industry are facing today. As part of the Key Scientific Challenges Program you’ll gain access to Yahoo!’s world-class scientists, some of the richest and largest data repositories in the world, and have the potential to make a huge impact on the future of the Internet while driving your research forward.

THE CHALLENGES AREAS INCLUDE:

- Search Experiences
- Machine Learning
- Data Management
- Information Extraction
- Economics
- Statistics
- Multimedia
- Computational Advertising
- Social Sciences
- Green Computing
- Security
- Privacy

KEY SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES AWARD RECIPIENTS RECEIVE:

- $5,000 unrestricted research seed funding which can be used for conference fees and travel, lab materials, professional society membership dues, etc.

- Access to select Yahoo! datasets

- The unique opportunity to collaborate with our industry-leading scientists

- An invitation to this summer’s exclusive Key Scientific Challenges Graduate Student Summit where you’ll join the top minds in academia and industry to present your work, discuss research trends and jointly develop revolutionary approaches to fundamental problems

CRITERIA: To be eligible, you must be currently enrolled in a PhD program at any accredited institution.

We’re accepting applications from January 24th – March 11th, 2011 and winners will be announced by mid April 2011.

To learn more about the program and how to apply, visit http://labs.yahoo.com/ksc.

First: I did it! A perfect 16 out of 31. I completed the (ok, my) World Blogging Month challenge to blog every odd day in the month of March.

Last year WoBloMo leapt out of the gates with five participants but I fell five hours short of the goal. As far as I know only Anthony and I returned for year two. He succeeded too according to official Australian Rules.

Again, I found the exercise worthwhile, clearing a number of items out of my queue, albeit mostly the easy and inane ones (c.f. the barking), and boosting readership.

In fact, I enjoyed it so much that I’ve signed up for World Blogging Year (WoBloYe). I will blog every odd day of every month at least through the end of 2010, starting today.

In fact I have formally pledged to stickk to my goal. Moreover, I am putting my money where my mouth is, PM-style. For every odd day of the month that passes blog-post-free I will donate $100 to my anticharity, the re-election fund for Don McLeroy. If I miss two deadlines in a row, my antidonation will double. Three missed deadlines in a row and it will quadruple, etc.

I’ve enlisted kibotzer’s help and you can follow my progress there. Wish me luck!

Update 2010/04/02: April Fools!

P.S. In all seriousness, read that New York Times article about Don McLeroy. It’s one of the scariest articles I’ve read in a long time. It’s about how ultra conservatives on the Texas board of education are rewriting history and science according to biblical and republican dogma, and how standards in that enormous state can dictate what gets printed in textbooks nationwide. They’ve done things like add Newt Gingrich and delete Edward Kennedy as significant Americans. They’ve banned classic children’s books by Bill Martin Jr. because they confused him with a different Bill Martin, author of “Ethical Marxism”.

It is the most crazy-making thing to sit there and watch a dentist and an insurance salesman rewrite curriculum standards in science and history. Last year, Don McLeroy believed he was smarter than the National Academy of Sciences, and he now believes he’s smarter than professors of American history.

My first attempt. I’m sure you can do better.



The barking. Reenact task. Arnold understanding a caveated consideration. Snowmen ammunition, shoutouts stumbling. A gridded courtroom, community pumping. Cussions berate

There’s no doubt that social ties have tremendous value: people find love and work largely through the people they know and the people the people they know know.

And there’s no doubt that digital representations of social ties add value. Facebook does improve people’s lives.1

The puzzle, and one of the key challenges facing companies like Facebook, Google, and Yahoo!., is how social media can make money. So far the evidence is most users won’t pay directly, which leaves ideas like virtual goods, community marketplaces, app stores, and, of course, advertising. Unfortunately, although we know great ways to advertise to people searching, and decent ways to advertise to people viewing content, it’s less clear how to advertise to people communicating.

P&G’s Ted McConnell puts it bluntly:

What in heaven’s name made you think you could monetize the real estate in which somebody is breaking up with their girlfriend?

Riffing off of this quote, Wired asks the $15 billion question: Is social advertising an oxymoron?:

So, what if social media and advertising just don’t mix?

SocialMedia.com, a social advertising startup, begs to differ (hat tip to Cong Yu), reacting to the same provocative McConnell quote. Their answer:

Advertisers only pay when users volunteer to say something about the brand to their friends.

Indeed, this sort of paid version of Bem+Wom (“BEtter Mousetrap + Word Of Mouth”) — more on this in the next post — is one of the first things people think of when pondering how to monetize a social network. But can it work well and if so, how?


Three disjoint friends like Rooster Sauce. Who knew?

1For example, I never would have guessed that three completely disjoint friends of mine are all fans of Sriracha Rooster Sauce. Who knew?

I’m planning to take the World Blogging Month (WoBloMo) challenge in March. Join me!

The goal is simple: blog at least every other day from March 1 to March 31. Post something — anything — on every odd day of the month and you win. Skip any day not divisible by 2 and you lose.

Many bloggers already write every day or nearly so. More power to them. For the rest of us, who blog infrequently and spend copious time arguing with their inner editors, ludicrous and artificial pretenses can be a good thing.

WoBloMo resembles the write-a-novel-in-a-month contest NaNoWriMo and other timed artistic challenges prefaced on the idea that quantity and quality can be friends. By suppressing the Spock-like perfectionist inside you, you can bring out your inner Kirk and “just do it”. Agonizing over details always has diminishing returns and sometimes, perversely, can make things worse. Or so the theory goes. You be the judge once (if) my WoBloMo fountain erupts.

Added 2009/02/26: Full disclosure.

This is the first of a series of challenge posts. I’ll pose a problem in the hopes of convincing the wise Internauts to come forth with solutions. I intend the problems to be do-able rather than mind boggling: simply intriguing problems that I’d love to know the answer to but haven’t found the time yet to work through. Think of it as Web 2.0 enlightenment mixed with good old fashioned laziness. Or think of it as Yahoo! Answers, blog edition.

Don’t expect to go unrewarded for your efforts! I’ll pay ten yootles, plus an optional and unspecified tip, to the respondent with the best solution. What can you do with these yootles? Well, to make a long story short, you can spend them with me, people who trust me, people who trust people who trust me, etc. (In lieu of a formal microformat specification for yootles offers, for now I’ll simply use the keyword/tag “yootleoffer” to identify opportunities to earn yootles, in the spirit of “freedbacking”.)


dice So, on with the challenge! I just returned from a pit stop in Las Vegas, so this one is weighing on my mind. I’d like to see an analysis of strategies for playing craps that take into account the variance of the bettor’s wealth, not just the expectation.

Every idiot knows the best strategy to minimize the casino’s edge in craps: bet the pass line and load up on the maximum odds possible. The odds bet in craps is one of the only fair bets in the casino, so the more you load up on odds, the closer the casino’s edge is to zero. But despite the fact that craps is one of the fairest games on the casino floor, it’s also one of the highest variance games, meaning that your money can easily swing wildly up or down in a manner of minutes. So on a fixed budget, craps can be exceedingly dangerous. What I’m looking for is one or more strategies that have lower variance, and are thus less risky.

So that this challenge is not vague and open ended, let me boil this overall goal down into something fairly specific:

The Challenge: Suppose that I walk into a casino with $200. I arrive at a craps table that has a $5 minimum bet and allows 2X odds. I’m looking for a strategy that:

  1. Has at least some chance of making a profit (otherwise, why bother?), and
  2. Maximizes the expected amount of time (number of dice rolls) that my $200 will last.

I prefer if you ignore the center bets in your analysis. Bonus points if you examine what happens with different budgets, table limits, and/or allowed odds. Another way to motivate this is as follows: I have a small fixed budget but want to hang around a high-limit table for as long as possible, because I get a better atmosphere, more drinks, and a glimpse of life as a high roller.

As an example, here is a strategy that appears to have very low variance: On the come out roll, bet on both the pass line and the don’t pass line. If the shooter rolls 2, 3, 7, or 11 you break even. If the shooter rolls 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10, you’re also guaranteed to eventually break even. The only time you lose money is when the shooter rolls a 12 on a come out roll, in which case you lose your pass line bet and keep your don’t pass bet (i.e., you lose half your total stake). There’s only one problem with this strategy: it’s moronic. You have absolutely no possibility of winning: you can only either break even or lose. One thing you might add to this strategy to satisfy condition (1) is to take or give odds whenever the shooter establishes a point. Will this strategy make my $200 last longer on average than playing the pass line only?

For bonus points, I’d love to see a graph plotting a number of different strategies along the efficient frontier, trading off casino edge and variance. Another bonus point question: In terms of variance, is it better to place a single pass line bet with large odds, or is it better to place a number of come bets all with smaller odds?

To submit your answer to this challenge, post a comment with a link to your solution. If you can dig up the answer somewhere on the web, more power to you. If you can prove something analytically, I bow to you. Otherwise, I expect this to require some simple Monte Carlo simulation. Followed of course by some Monte Carlo verification. :-) Have fun!

Addendum: The winner is … Fools Gold!

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